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Fifth Avenue Critics - 1905, Etching.

Morse 128. Edition 100. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed 100 proofs in the bottom center margin and #14 in the bottom left sheet corner.

Image size 4 9/16 x 6 3/4 inches (116 x 171 mm); sheet size 9 11/16 x 12 9/16 inches (245 x 320 mm).

A superb, early impression, with rich burr, on Van Gelder Zonen cream laid paper; full margins (2 7/16 to 2 7/8 inches). The printer's tack holes in the sheet edges, in excellent condition.

Ex collection Lynn E. Prasse, former curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cleveland Museum of Art, with her initials in pencil in the top right sheet corner, recto, and her 2 collection stamps, verso.

“These two fashionable ladies used to drive up and down Fifth Avenue everyday.... about four o’clock of an afternoon, showing themselves and criticizing others” –John Sloan (1946).

Collections: Library of Congress; Metropolitan Museum of Art.

$4400.


Man Monkey - 1905, Etching.

Morse 130. Edition 100. Signed and titled in pencil. Inscribed 100 proof.

Image size 4 7/8 x 6 7/8 inches (124 x 175 mm), sheet size 9 11/16 x 12 3/8 inches (246 x 315 mm).

A fine, rich impression, with full margins (2 3/8 to 2 7/8 inches) on cream wove paper. The printer's tack holes in the sheet edges, in excellent condition.

“In the side streets of Chelsea and Greenwich Village districts, the one man band with hand organ accompanist furnished free entertainment to those who dropped no pennies. He worried the horse-drawn traffic of the time, but before many years the automobile and motor truck cleared him from the streets” –John Sloan (1946).

Collections: Library of Congress (Pennell Fund purchase), Metropolitian Museum of Art.

$2600.


Night Windows - 1910, Etching.

Morse 152. Edition 100 (110 printed). Signed, titled, and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower left.

Image size 5 1/8 x 6 3/4 inches (130 x 171 mm); sheet size 9 5/8 x 12 1/2 inches (232 x 318 mm).

A fine, rich impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (2 1/4 to 2 7/8 inches), in excellent condition. Printed by Peter Platt, the printer's tack holes at the sheet edges.

Reproduced: Prints and Their Creators, A World History, Carl Zigrosser, Crown Publishers Inc., 1974; Whistler to Weidenaar: American Prints 1870-1950, Museum of Art, RISD, 1987.

Exhibited: the Armory Show, New York, 1913.

Collections: Delaware Art Museum; The Library of Congress; Metropolitian Museum of Art; Museum of Art, RISD; National Gallery of Art; The Phillips Collection.

SOLD


Arch Conspirators- 1917, Etching.

Morse 183. Edition 100. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower left.

Image size 4 1/4 x 5 7/8 inches (108 x 149 mm); sheet size 8 1/8 x 10 7/8 inches (206 x 276 mm).

A fine, rich impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (1 5/8 to 2 5/8 inches); in excellent condition. Printed by Ernest Roth.

“A mid-winter party on the roof of Washington Square Arch. Among those present: Marcel Duchamp, Charles Ellis (actor), John Sloan, and Gertrude Drick (poet), instigator of the affair. A document was drawn up to establish the secession of Greenwich Village from the United States.... The door of the Arch stairway has since been kept locked.” (Dart 57) Another article about the incident, “Arch Conspirators” by Margaret Christie (New York Tribune, Dec. 30, 1923), tells essentially the same story. It quotes Sloan at length in the author’s words and reproduces the 1st state of this etching. –Morse, p. 209

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitian Museum of Art.

SOLD


Hell Hole- 1917, Etching and Aquatint.

Morse 186. Edition 100 (110 printed); 2nd state of 2. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right.

Image size 7 3/8 x 9 3/8 inches (187 x 238 mm); sheet size 11 5/8 x 15 1/8 inches (295 x 384 mm).

A superb, richly inked impression on cream laid paper, with full margins (1 3/4 to 3 inches), in excellent condition. Printed by Peter Platt, the printer's tack holes at the sheet edges.

“The back room of Wallace’s at Sixth Avenue and West Fourth Street was a gathering place for artists, writers, and bohemians of Greenwich Village. The character in the upper right hand corner of the plate is Eugene O’Neill. Strongly etched lines are reinforced by aquatint tones.” -John Sloan

Reproduced: Whistler to Weidenaar: American Prints 1870-1950, Museum of Art, RISD, 1987; The American Scene: Prints from Hopper to Pollock, Stephen Coppel, The British Museum, 2008; The American Scene on Paper; Prints and Drawings from the Schoen Collection, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2008.

Exhibited and Reproduced: The American Scene: Prints from Hopper to Pollock, Stephen Coppel, The British Museum, 2008.

Collections: British Museum; Delaware Art Museum; Library of Congress (Pennell Fund purchase); Phillips Collection; Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design; Smithsonian American Art Museum.

$4800.


New Year's Eve and Adam- 1918, Etching.

Morse 190. Edition 100, only 85 printed. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed in the plate, lower left.

Image size 3 3/4 x 2 3/4 inches (95 x 70 mm); sheet size 8 1/2 x 6 inches (216 x 152 mm).

A fine impression, on antique cream laid paper, with full margins (1 5/8 to 2 3/8 inches), in excellent condition. Printed by Ernest Roth.

Sloan used this print as a greeting card for New Year’s 1919.

"With some exaggeration this records an incident of the holiday season in a New York Hotel, the Brevoort." –John Sloan

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitian Museum of Art.

$1100.


The Movey Troupe - 1920, Etching.

Morse 196. Edition 100, 50 printed. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right and titled, lower left.

Image size 5 1/4 x 7 7/8 inches (133 x 181 mm); sheet size 9 7/8 x 12 3/4 inches (251 x 324 mm).

A fine, crisp impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (2 3/8 to 3 inches). Original tack holes in the sheet edges, in excellent condition. Printed by Peter Platt.

"Director, leading man, leading lady, and camera man have made use of one of the picturesque backgrounds to be found in Greenwich Village at that time" (John Sloan, 1945).

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitian Museum of Art.

$2200.


Snowstorm in the Village- 1920, Etching.

Morse 216. Edition 100 (3rd state of 3). Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil.

Image size 7 x 5 inches (178 x 127 mm); sheet size 11 5/8 x 8 1/8 inches (295 x 206 mm).

A fine impression, on antique cream laid paper, with full margins (1 1/2 to 2 3/8 inches); in excellent condition.

Reproduced: American Master Prints from the Betty and Douglas Duffy Collection, the trust for museum exhibitions Washington, D.C., 1987; Our Town; Images and stories from the Museum of the City of New York, Harry N. Abrams, 1997.

Collections: British Museum; The Art Institute of Chicago; Library of Congress; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of the City of New York; Smithsonian American Art Museum.

SOLD


Indian Detour - 1927, Etching.

Morse 231. Edition 100 (3rd state of 3). Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right.

Image size 6 x 7 1/4 inches (152 x 184 mm); sheet size 10 3/8 x 11 3/4 inches (264 x 298 mm).

A fine, crisp impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (2 1/4 inches), in excellent condition. Printed by Ernest Roth.

“A satire of the Harvey Indian Tour. Buses take the tourists out to view the Indian dances, which are religious ceremonials and naturally not understood as such by the visiting crowds” (Dart 79). This scene is identified as the corn dance at Santa Dominga Pueblo, in an updated article from the Santa Fe New Mexican of August or September 1936.

Collection: Library of Congress.

SOLD


Fourteenth Street the Wigwam (Tammany Hall) - 1928, Etching.

Morse 235. Edition 100, 110 printed. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower left.

Image size 9 11/16 x 6 7/8 inches (246 x 175 mm); sheet size 18 x 12 5/8 inches (457 x 321 mm).

A superb, finely detailed impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (2 3/4 to 4 1/4 inches), the printer's tack holes in the sheet edges, in excellent condition. Printed by Peter Platt.

"Old Tammany Hall, the headquarters of the bosses of New York City, has ceased to exist. It lurked, menacing, in dingy red brick, across the way from the tawdry amusements of East Fourteenth Street. This plate was made in 1928 after the building had been torn down. My memory and a photo of a 1911 painting that had been burned furnished material for this new composition. My painting of 1934 now in the Metropolitan Museum was based on the etching." –John Sloan

Illustrated in American Prize Prints of the 20th Century, Albert Reese, American Artist's Group, Inc., New York, 1949.

Selected for 'Fifty Prints of the Year', 1929.

Collections: Library of Congress; Metropolitan Museum of Art.

$4400.


Nude at Piano - 1933, Etching.

Morse 265. Edition 100, only 85 printed. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right.

Image size 6 7/8 x 5 3/8 inches (175 x 137 mm); sheet size 13 1/4 x 8 3/8 inches (336 x 213 mm).

A fine, clean impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (1 1/2 to 4 inches), in excellent condition.

“A strong relationship between this etching and the painting of Renoir is to me quite noticeable. My own best results in painting of the nude are made with the same graphic intent” –John Sloan (1946).

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

$1900.


Nude and Arch - 1933, Etching.

Morse 267. Edition 100, only 85 printed. Signed, titled Nude and Washington Arch and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right.

Image size 6 7/8 x 5 3/8 inches (175 x 137 mm); sheet size 11 x 8 5/8 inches (279 x 219 mm).

A superb, crisp impression, in dark brown ink, on antique pale grey-green laid paper, with full margins (1 1/2 to 2 1/8 inches), in excellent condition.

“For about ten years [1927-35] my studio overlooked Washington Square, in a house remodelled by George Inness, Jr., son of the great landscape painter” –John Sloan (1945).

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitian Museum of Art.

SOLD


Costume Ball & Carnival of the Artists & Writers Dinner Club - 1933, Linocut.

Morse 277. No edition, printing unknown but assumed very small. Signed in pencil lower right, beneath the wolf’s hand-like paw.

Image size 19 x 12 inches (483 x 305 mm); sheet size 19 x 12 1/2 inches (483 x 318 mm).

A fine impression, in dark brown ink, on the full sheet of heavy, cream wove paper. A reinforced crease in the top left corner; a minor nick in the bottom center sheet edge and a small loss in the bottom right sheet corner; slight yellowing to the sheet edges left and right, not affecting the image. otherwise in very good condition. The image printed to the sheet edges top and bottom, with small margins left and right; the sheet size (19 x 12 1/2 inches) is consistent with impressions in the collections of Library of Congress and Metropolitan Museum of Art. Very scarce.

The poster copy reads: “Costume Ball & Carnival of the Artists and Writers Dinner Club . Webster Hall . 119 E 11th St. Friday Eve. Dec. 15. Heywood Broun . Master of Ceremonies . Stage Stars . Nat Mattlin & Orchestra . Tickets $1.00 now $1.50 at the door . For Sale . Breevort and Algonquin Hotels."

Webster Hall is one of New York City's most historically significant theater and event halls, having hosted social events of all types since the club's construction in 1886. Originally commissioned by Charles Goldstein – who operated the hall and also lived in the Annex with his family until his death in 1898 – the building was a "hall for hire" from its inception.
The first decade or so of Webster Hall's existence saw it host countless labor union rallies, weddings, meetings, lectures, dances, military functions, concerts, fundraisers and other events, particularly focused on the working-class and immigrant population of the surrounding Lower East Side neighborhood during its early years. Although it also hosted many high-society functions catering to the uppertens of the city, the hall earned a reputation as a gathering place for leftist, socialist, anarchist and labor union activity very early on. In 1912, Emma Goldman, the outspoken exponent of Anarchism, free love and birth control, led a march that brought the children of striking Lawrence, Massachusetts millworkers to the hall for a meal in order to dramatize the struggles of the working-class. In 1916, it was used as the strike headquarters for the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union; in 1920 meetings of the Sacco and Vanzetti Defense Committee were also held at Webster Hall.
In the 1910s and 20s, Webster Hall became known for its masquerade balls and other soirees reflecting the hedonism of the city's Bohemians. Nicknamed the "Devil's Playhouse" by the socialist magazine The Masses, Webster Hall became particularly known for the wilder and more risque events of the time; Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Stella, Man Ray, Francis Picabia, Charles Demuth, Scott Fitzgerald and many other notables regularly attended events there during this time.
The coming of Prohibition did not restrict the availability of alcohol at these events. Local politicians and police were said to turn a blind eye to the activities; at one time it was rumored that the venue was owned by the mobster Al Capone. The repeal of Prohibition was the reason for one of Webster Hall's biggest celebrations, "The Return of John Barleycorn."
In 1938, reporting on a fire in the building, the New York Times wrote: "Webster Hall ... began by seeing redcheeked debutantes introduced to society and ended – if ended it has – by seeing red-nosed bohemians thumbing defiance at society.”
Webster Hall has in fact continued its storied history to the present day as a venue for numerous recordings, concerts, and events. In 2008 the building was officially designated a New York City landmark, recognized for its significant role in the cultural development of New York City's Greenwich Village.
–Wikipedia.

Collections: Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Price On Request

New York, City, East Village, Urban Life, Lust, Party, wolf, werewolf, nude, Webster Hall

Winnowing Wheat - 1937, Etching.

Morse 297. Edition 100, only 74 printed; third state of three. Signed, titled and annotated 100 proofs in pencil. Signed and dated in the plate, lower right.

Image size 6 x 3 7/8 inches (152 x 98 mm); sheet size 11 3/8 x 8 1/2 inches (289 x 216 mm).

A fine, richly inked impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (2 1/4 to 2 7/8 inches), in excellent condition.

Collections: Library of Congress (Pennell Fund purchase); Metropolitan Museum of Art; New Mexico Museum of Art; Wichita Art Museum.

$1400.

Native American, Indian, Taos, Santa Fe, Southwest, Pueblo

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